HARRIS ANCESTORS


   TWO THOMAS HARRISES OF ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY, VIRGINIA
 

This work follows on from my description of Captain Thomas Harris, of Bechampton, Buckinghamshire, and of the 1624 Virginia Muster, in that, again, the family connections in England of such as the two Thomas Harrises of Virginia, one dying in 1672, the other in 1688, gave rise to where they settled in Virginia, and which families they married into.  

To borrow from my essay on Captain Thomas Harris about the importance of kinship groups as a means of survival and furtherment:

'In Darwinian terms, the English kinship groups that settled Virginia and were competing species that had to adapt to the harsh reality of frontier life in order to survive, with survival being dependent on mutual co-operation and alliances within their ranks – the concept of individual advancement through social enterprise'.

'The vital importance of kinship support in England and colonial America is well documented. Neel stated: ‘Marriage is not simply the union of two persons; rather, it binds together two kin groups. It reunites human society, which time and the divergence of family lines relentlessly pull asunder’ (1), a point elucidated by Pounds: ‘Even the state in medieval England required people to be linked in small groups or tithings, so that each could vouch for the others’ good behaviour. Almost everyone is, by the accident of birth, a member of a family, of a more extended kinship group (2). Such social-dependency arrangements were repeated by American settler families, as exampled by Doyle: ‘The listing of people, their names and birthplaces in the census rolls, shows clusters of fellow North or South Carolinians, Virginians, and Tennesseans living next to one another … The family names listed in the census suggest that kinship groups were being transplanted, either at once or in stages … letters and diaries reveal brief glimpses of the vast undergrowth of siblings, cousins and in-laws that existed beneath the moving population … These kinship networks among the elite were only the more visible of a much larger complex of relations that pulled kin and family across vast American distances to be with one another’ (3). Hofstra commented on the depth of marriages within kinship groups: ‘All of 22 Scots-Irish settlers from eleven nuclear families that had acquired land around Hite’s holdings were related. In nearly four out of every five marriages, children of these pioneering families found mates among these or other Scots-Irish families living nearby’ (4), and Majewski pointed ou their evolvement into ever larger entities: ‘Constant intermingling of the same families in the same neighborhoods produced increasingly large kinship groups’ (5). Hendricks studied the importance of kinship groups in a specific area of settlement: ‘Family connections and kinship groups were very important to the settlement of … land south of the James River’ (6).

To not take account of the importance of the kinship group in the settlement of seventeenth-century Virginia is akin to studying biology without a microscope.

(1) Carol Neel, Medieval Families, Perspectives on Marriage, Household, and Children, p. 200, 2004. (2) J. G. Pounds, The Culture of the English People, p. 255, 1994. (3) Don Harrison Doyle, ‘Faulkner’s County’, p. 255, 1994. (4) Warren R. Hofstra, The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley, p. 39, 2003. (5) John Majewski, ‘A House Dividing: Economic Development in Pennsylvania and Virginia, p. 17, 2000. (6) Christopher E. Hendricks, The Backcountry Towns of Colonial Virginia, p. 52, 2006.

I had previously identified the group of Harris under discussion as eminating from the East Sussex/Kent region of England, as a consequence of them having definite associations in Virginia with families from this region. That much holds true, but such associations came about through an intermarriage with the very influential family of Warren, of Ripple Court, Kent. The families of the two Thomas Harises under discussion came from Southwark, England, as did associated families of Bassano, Griffin, Hart, Newsum, Payne, Powell, Taliafero, and Woodward, this latter family being intermarried with the Waltons of Virginia.

For the most part, the Harris family of Southwark were members of trade associations, such as the Fishmongers’ Company - one of the Twelve Great Livery Companies of the City of London, and among the most ancient of the City Guilds, which acted as an wholesaler of fish, which bought fish cheaply from the Dutch, much to the outrage of English fishermen; the dispute being settled by Act of Parliament. As the other Livery Companies, the Fishmongers acted as a mutual benefit society, supporting its members in times of need. (See W. Herbert, History of the worshipful Company of Fishmongers, 1837).

                                 

These Harris were not connected to iconic Sergeants, Captains, and Majors of Virginia, but, I suggest, are none the worse for that. Their origin can be speculated about - there are some tangential connections to the Harris family of Hayne, and to Wales; and those ardent for some connection to the Harris of Crixe might note the connection of William Rutter to Southwark, and he to a family of Payne: 'Rutter’s election to the Parliament of 1529 may have been the work of the King’s brother-in-law, the Duke of Suffolk, who had a house in Southwark. Although he was not a stranger to the Sussex borough that returned him, as he owned a house in East Grinstead and his brother Thomas lived there, such personal links would hardly have sufficed to procure his election in a borough belonging to the duchy of Lancaster: he may have been helped by George Payne, an influential local gentleman and servant to Sir John Gage, one of the knights for Sussex in 1529, who was apparently to be charged with Rutter’s wages. Presumably Rutter sat for East Grinstead again in 1536, in accordance with the King’s request for the re-election of the previous Members, and if so he doubtless supported the bill for the enlargement of St. Margaret’s churchyard, Southwark, enacted in that Parliament (28 Hen. VIII, c.31): earlier in the reign he had been a churchwarden of St. Margaret’s ... Rutter made his will on 22 Oct. 1540 ... he made provision for his wife, two married daughters, sons-in-law, kinsmen and servants. His brother Thomas was to receive 20s. a horse and several small sums owing to Rutter, who added ‘Also I will that the executors of George Payne [who had died in 1538] do pay to my brother Thomas Rutter 10s. for my wages when I was burgess’. He appointed his wife executrix and his ‘brother’ Edward Lowe (or in his absence John Smith of the Vine) overseer of the will, which was proved on 8 Oct. 1541, seven days after Rutter’s burial at St. Saviour’s, Southwark'(The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982). William Harris of Southminster married, thirdly, Anne Rutter. William rutter was born by 1488, and could have been the father of Anne. On January 21, 1614, Sir Arthur Harris married 'Lady Ann Bowyer' at St. Olave's: January 18, 1614 - Bond. Sir Arthur Harris, knight, of Crixeth, Essex, widower, 30, and Dame Anne Bowyer, of St. Olave, Hart Street, 22, widow of Sir Henry Bowyer, knight, who deceased three-quarter year since - at St. Olave, Hart Street'.

It would also perhaps be idle to conjecture on the exact parentage of the Harris mentioned hereinafter. Essentially, the lines of descent involve: (1) William Harris, whose will shows him to be kin of Edward Griffin, (2) William, his underage son; (3) William Harris Jr., his son (the Newsum/Hart/Sheppard/Spencer associate; (4) 'John Harris, of St Saviour', Southwark, cousin of (1); (5) Thomas Harris, his second son; (6) Richard Harris, named in the will of Ellen Harris, wife of (4); (7) any other cousin of (1). It is too easily possible to assume relationships from recorded marriages, an example being that of  William Harris, who, at St. Olave, Southwark, married (May 25, 1643) Elizabeth Arnell (para. 41). Anthony Arnell was a transportee of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672: March 2, 1658: 'Thomas Harris, 1000 acres, Isle of Wight Co. Upon a swamp running into the W. branch of Nansamond Riv., including 2 Indian fields.  Trans. of 20 persons: John Hardy, Alexander Vaughn, Ann Lees, William Todd, Eliz. Jones, Mary Wood, John Davis, John Griffin, Fran. Anderson, Jno. Pew, Ann Greene, Eliza. Nusome, Weltin Harris, Anth. Arnold, Sam. Trobury, Alexander Cahill (Nugent, 'Cavaliers and Pioneers', vol. 1, p. 386). Anthony Arnold was associated with William Edwards: October 14, 1670; (para. 43) Whereas Willm. Richardson in his life tyme delivered unto Capt. George Lydall a list of bills as under his hand appears amounting to 12,000 pounds of tobacco and caske wch he was to retorne or be accomptable for it and it appearing that there was a bill of 3,000 pounds Tobo in the said list due from Mr. Arnold wch belonged to the orphans of Wm. Edwards decd.' (McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, p. 230). He was also associated with William and John Harris: para. 44) March 24, 1726: 'William Harris, Junr., 1500 acres, New Land, Hanover Co., adj. Mrs. Arnold and George Woodroof’s lines; on Overton’s fork of Elk Creek (Nugent, C&P, Vol. III, p. 303). April 11, 1732: 'John Harris, 400 acres New Land, Hanover County; adj. Ambrose Joshua Smith, Capt. Thomas Carr and Ann Arnold; on low side of Great Rockey Creek (ibid. p. 414). John Harris of Cedar Creek, who died before 1745, established the Quaker Meeting with John Stanley in 1721, it being assumed that he married Mary Stanley, John Stanley's daughter. It has been noted that the Harris of St. olave's had intermarried with a family of Stanley. William and John Harris, neighbours of Mrs. Arnold, were both perhaps the sons of William Harris (and 'Hennerettah'), and he the son of William Harris and Elizabeth Arnold, of St. Olave's, Southwark. 'Jane Arnold transported 1686, headright claimed by Mathew Tomlin, Isle of Wight County' (para. 47).

What can not be assumed is any clear line of descent, for the 'kinship principle' was based on the dictum that a marriage of your cousin was an open doorway to your marriage into the same family. It is for this treason, the 'common ownership of association', that I have declined to construct a genealogical table for the Harris family of Southwark and Virginia. I find it difficult to make a clear sense of such land deeds as: (para. 67). 'George Bryar & Rich. Lawrence, 3000 acs. Rappa. Co. on Ewd. side of Rappa. Cr., 16 Mar. 1663. Beg. on sd. Cr. side adj. land of Col. More Fantleroy (Samuel Payne's son-in-law; Samuel Payne, to repeat, being of the Payne family of St. olave's, Sothwark) & opposite to the now plantation of Col. Walker, extending along the Cr. side to land of Charles Grimes, dec'd., bounded by same, land of Mr. Jno. Hull & his own to white oak in his Cr. &c. Trans. of 60 pers: Jno. Cole, Wm. Williams, Mary Jones, Wm. Wright, 7 Negroes, Ann Jones, Andrew Jones, Stephen Waters, Richard White, Nathall. Pine, Henry Addison, Jno. Martin, Mary Cole, Mary Wise, Peter Ware, Jno. Pigg, Jno. Garratt, Mary Stone, Ann Stone, Thomas Harris, Ann Harris, Susan Harris, Margtt. Williamson, Richard Mines, Mary Orchard, thrice, Wm. Stephens, Mathews Peters, Stephen Margetts, Timothy Collins, Robt. Collingworth, Peter Gage, & his wife, Wm. Norton, Warwick Pea, James Stone, Francis Skinner, Andrew Foreman, Norton Jones, Henry Etmore (or Elmore), Peter Rix, Susan Lawnes, Mathew Tomlin, Richd. Everdew, Susan Pike, 5 Negroes; Thomas Atkins, Andrew Joyner, Thomas Wms. (Williams), Margtt. Jones'. Who were Thomas, Ann, and Susan Harris? Is Thomas Harris he who died in 1688?, associated with Mathew Tomlin. Is this St. Olave's baptismal record of any relevance? - 'Anna Harris, 5 February 1658, f. Thomas Harris', or, indeed, this one: 'John Harris, 15 March 1656, f. Thomas Harris' (who died in 1672?). (para. 68) Anthony Arnold 1669, 31 Aug: Witnessed, with Timothy Davis, a power of attorney by Arthur Hodges to Edward Hudson, and a power of attorney by Katherine Hubbert to John Forth to acknowledge her right and title to 375 acres sold by her former husband, Thomas Williamson, to James Fossett, Rappahannock Co., VA. (1) Richard Hubbard had been granted 1600 acres of land in Westmoreland Co., VA for transport of 32 persons on 12 Dec 1654, among them William Arnoll.
 
What follows is long on description, but short on answering the cunundrums inherent in Harris genealogy. This is a draft copy, on which I have not worked extensively, and will contain errors, but it at least, in my opinion, identifies the ball park from which this family of Harris originated, and, in that, may assist the research of others.   

                                                                                 ST. OLAVE'S                                                                      

                      

  

1. A Harris family were associated with Southwark in the sixteenth-century, where they had an association with Richard and Christopher Payne, as given here: 'The mayor, commonalty and citizens of London, governors of St Thomas's Hospital, Southwark, and John Herdson v. Wilfred Lewty and Henry Fillion alias Filoll. A parcel of land called Capons Hill, and another supposed to be called Carters Marsh in the parish of Alvethley. Whether they belong to a messuage called Faunes, belonging to Henry Northey and Elizabeth, his wife, and now or late in the occupation of the defendant Lewty, or to the manor of Alvethley, belonging to the said hospital Surveys of the manor in 1563 and 1578, in which certain lands were omitted. Mentioning the New Inned Marshes said to have been 'inned and wonne' by Richard Payne and Christopher Payne, his father, late farmers of the said manor; and a suit between Mr Payne and a Mr Harris concerning the lease in reversion of the manor. Essex. 38 Eliz. Easter & Trin.'. This is John Payne, who married 'Ann Floode, s'vant to Mr. Walton', on September 3, 1570.

2. 'Mr Harris' was William Harris, whose will shows him to be kin of Edward Griffin, which had considerable impact on future relationship patterns in Virginia. The Will of 'William Harris, Fishmonger, of Saint Saviour', Southwark, Surrey, was proved November 1, 1600, naming Sarah, his wife, William, his underage son; Alice his sister; John Treherne, his father-in-law; John Trehern his brother-in-law; John Harris and John Cooke, his cousins; his brother-in-law, Edward Griffin; his cousin Wafern's three unnamed children, and his cousin, Lentell. Executor: wife Sarah. Overseers: father-in-law, and cousin, ... Lentell. Witnesses were: Edward Griffin; Christopher Toppinge; Margaret Treherne; William Harris (TNA, Prob.11/96, ff. 261v-262r). William Harris and Edward Griffin both married daughters of John Treherne Sr.; see the will of 'John Treherne, Chief Porter of the Gates, of St. Saviour', Southwark, proven October 28, 1618.

3. There is every possibility of these people being acquainted with William Shakespeare: 'Nicholas Brend leased the ground on which the Globe was built by lease dated 21 February 1599 to Richard Burbage (1568-1619), Cuthbert Burbage (1564/5-1636), William Kempe, Augustine Phillips (d. 1605), Thomas Pope (d. 1603) John Heminges (1566-1630) and William Shakespeare (1564-1616) of Stratford upon Avon (see TNA REQ 4/1/2): For Nicholas Brend’s marriage to Margaret Strelley without his father’s consent, see Berry, pp. 84-5. Margaret (nee Strelley) Brend was also a cousin of the courtier John Stanhope (c. 1540-1621), 1st Baron Stanhope, and his sister, Lady Jane (nee Stanhope) Townshend Berkeley (see Berry, p. 85) ... a later sale to Sir Matthew Browne confirms land 'late in the several tenures' of John Treherne, gentleman, George Archer, porter, Laurence Bush, draper, John Johnson, tailor, John Knolles, Abraham Campion, beer-brewer, Richard Burbage and William Shackspeare, gentlemen, John Bingham, saddler, and Robert Bromfield, gentleman' (NationalL Archives C 54/1722, mm. 5-7). Although such an association with Shakespeare might seem to be tangential to genealogy, the proposition that Aemelia Bassano was the 'dark lady' of his sonnets, and the connection of Shakespeare, and the Bassanos and Laniers, to Southwark, gives a context to a marriage of 1662 between Thomas Harris and Dorothie Bassano, as described hereinafter.

4. Stuart Diamond's 'Notes on The Dark Lady Sonnets' (2008) give account of Aemelia Bassano: 'Aemilia Bassano Lanyer (1569-1645) published a collection of verse, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (“Hail God, King of the Jews”), 1611, which has gained considerable attention for its variety, quality, and proto-feminist stance. Lanyer may also be the first woman writing in English both to claim divine calling as a poet and to seek patronage through a community of intellectual women whom she praises and seeks to represent.

5. Aemilia Bassano was born in 1569 (the year of Spenser’s first publication), the daughter of court musician Baptista Bassano and his “reputed wife”, Margaret Johnson. Her father was a native of Venice, the youngest of several brothers brought to England by Henry VIII to enrich the music of the court, and may have been of Jewish background. Her mother was an Englishwoman with ties to families associated with the reformation wing of the English church. Baptista died when Aemilia was seven, and her mother when she was eighteen. At some point in her childhood she was educated in the household of Susan Bertie, the young Dowager Duchess of Kent, where she was exposed to standard renaissance humanist texts and ideas'.


6. William Harris (the 'Fishmonger') was the'cousin' of John Harris, that is; 'John Harris, of St Saviour', Southwark, whose Will, proved May 2, 1616,states that he is 'very sick of body', and requests 'burial in St Saviour parish near where his wife is lately buried'; and names Robert Harris, his eldest son, Thomas Harris, his second son; Mary Harris, his underage daughter, and Margery Catster, his cousin. Others named: Nicholas Wilkinson. John Gattes. Executor: Christopher Olliver, 'his trusty and wellbeloved friend'. Overseers: William Catster; Robert Maymond. Witnesses: John Grenocke; Robert Maymonde (TNA, Prob.11/127, ff.345v-346r).


7.'Ellen Harris, of London, widow' of the said Robert Harris, stated in her Will, proved March 25, 1631, that she was born in Presteigne, Radnor (Wales) on New Years Day (no year given), and she is ‘in good and perfect health of minde and memory’. She asks to be buried in the church of St Olave's, Southwark, near her late husband, Robert Harris. She made a bequest to the poor children of Christ's Hospital, and to the Company of Woolwinders of London. Family members named in her Will were: Sarah Harris, her goddaughter, 'not yet 16 years old, daughter of Robert Harris'; Frances Harris, wife of Richard Harris; Dorcas Bridges, late wife of Robert Marcklame, now wife of Roger Bridges; Sarah Bridges, underage daughter of Dorcas Bridges; Elizabeth Perkins, widow; Margaret, eldest daughter of her cousin, Isaac Driver, deceased, and his widow Barbara Driver; and their three other unnamed children; Sarah Parker, her cousin, and her daughter, Sarah Parker. Executors: Jeffrey Kerby, citizen and grocer; Reginald Parker, citizen and haberdasher. Overseer: William Wilkenson. Witnesses: Richard Greene, scrivener; Thomas Watts; Richard Badowe, servant to Richard Greene (TNA, Prob. 11/159, ff. 286v-288v). The said Richard Harris may have been a nephew of John Harris, obit. 1616, and father of a namesake, who, on May 2, 1641, married 'Ann Edwarde', at St. Olave's, Southwark.

8. William Harris was associated with a family of Williamson, which was probably of great significance to later 'kinship marriages' in Virginia: The Will of 'Jeffrey Williamson, of St Saviour, fishmonger', was proved April 8, 1589, naming Elizabeth, his wife, and Thomas Williamson, his brother. Executor: Elizabeth, his wife. Overseers: 'William Harris, fishmonger'; Ferdinando Blake, baker. Witnesses: Alice Williamson; William Harris; Ferdinando Blake (TNA, Prob. 11/73, f. 283r-v).

9. Given the Harris connection to the Griffin family of Southwark, London, and Virginia, as will be exampled, it seems certain that Richard Williamson was of this family: 'Richard Williamson, Appraisal taken November 16, 1665. Mr. Peter Garland Adm., Appraisers: Francis Ayers, Richard Williamson, Thomas Griffin, George Surbe'. Reg: August 9, 1666 (B. 2, p. 6). A Thomas Griffin married Frances Karzley, on November 26, 1653, at St. Olave's, Southwark: 'Thomas Griffine, marriner, & ffrancis Karzley were married by Justice Smith'.

10. Edward Griffin (para. 2) was the father of Thomas Griffin, father of (1) George Griffin, whose wife was Joan Griffin, as described in her will, proved April 19, 1661: 'Joan Griffin of the County of High Nockect in the River Ausemund in the Country of Virginia and now being in St. Ollave's parish near London and intending, by the permission of God, very suddenly to pass over for Virginia in the good ship called the Margaret of London, whereof under God Mr Robert Fox goeth as commander'. She names her sons: 'David, son of George Griffin (at twenty one). Robert Griffin, another son (at twenty one). Thomas Griffin, another (at twenty one). Richard Griffin, a fourth son of the said George, towards the keeping of him at school, and after my decease when he shall accomplish the age of twenty and one years my whole will and intent is that my whole plantation in the County of Warisquick in the Land of Virginia &c'. Her son, David Griffin is recorded thus: 'David Griffin of Basinghall Street, London, citizen and tallowchandler', in his Will, proved December 12, 1679, in which he names 'My brother in law John Hobbs (a family of Hobbs are recorded in the St. Olave registers - M.S), and sister Elizabeth his wife and her two children John and Thomas Hewett' ... 'my brother Samuel Griffin in Virginia forty shillings for a ring to wear in remembrance of me. Brother in law John Hobbs to be executor (King, 161). (2) Thomas Griffin, father of his namesake, appraiser of the estate of Richard Williamson, Leroy Griffin, and Col. Samuel Griffin, who, on March 4, 1661, declared: 'Know all men that I Samuell Griffin of the County of Rappaanock in Virginia merchant doe for good causes give unto Thomas Griffin the lawfull son of Thomas Griffin all my right title & interest of the tract of land mented & further do assigne and sett ove the land unto him the Said Thomas Griffin his heirs and assignes foreer but provided he dieth with out issue of his body lawfully begotten then I do like wise here by grive and grant the aforemenconed land unto Winifred Griffin his sister and to her heirs and aissnges for ever & I do by these present acquitt the land for evre from me my heirs. Wits. Robert Rogers, Ambrose Cleare, Robert Saunders. Signed Samuel Griffin and Sarah Griffin.

11. Col. Samuel Griffin, of Northumberland (previously of Rappahannock), merchant, died in 1703, leaving a daughter, Katherine, who married (I) William Fauntleroy, of Richmond county, which was formerly Rappahannock, (2) David Gwyn, of the same place. In his Will, Samuel Griffin names his brother-in-law, 'John Hobbs, of London, and sister Elizabeth, his wife ... cousin Thomas Hewitt, son of my said sister ... kinsman Jno. Hewitt (another nephew) ... Katherine, daughter of sister Katherine Sprigg, deceased ... kinsman Samuel Godwin'. He bequeathed to 'his kinsman Col. Wm. Tayloe a ring'. Sprigg and Browne intermarriages are recorded in the registers of St. Olave; see entries for May 26, 1681, and an Hobbs family of that place are well recorded.

12. Thomas Griffin, Richard Williamson's appraiser, and kin of the Harris family of St. Olave's, was a merchant trading in Rappahannock, as evidenced by several patents, thus recorded: 'Abraham Moone and Thomas Griffin patented 1400 acres, Lancaster Co., VA. July 4, 1653; Thomas Griffin patented 1064 acres on the North side of Rappahannock River; on the westward side of a creek known by the name of Farnarn Creek, adjoing the land of Captn Moore Fantleroy, Lancaster Co., VA., and Leroy Griffin' (see Beverly Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, p. 190, who records a deed concerning Leroy Griffin and Thomas Griffin being witnessed by Howell Powell, on July 8, 1652).

13. Thomas Griffin is mentioned in the Will of Edward Bradshaw as 'Thomas Griffin, my countryman'. Bradshaw gave cattle to Capt. Moore Fantleroy, as he did to John Jones, son of Rice Jones. He gave to 'Winnefred Griffin daughter of Thomas Griffin one cow', and to 'Jone daughter in law to Rice Jones a chest, wastecoat', etc, He gave to Thomas Griffin '8 hhd tobo. I sold to Mr Travers ... also all other goods that is betwixt me & Mr Underwood'. Thos. Griffin Exor. Rec. June 17, 1656. Thomas Griffin, in his will, probated April 9, 1670, left to his son and namesake 'land I bought of Captain Fulgham' ('Wills & Admins', 1-3, p. 9). John Harris, son of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, married, firstly, Margaret Hobbs, as hereinafter described, and, secondly, on April 13, 1689, Elizabeth Church, by whom he had a daughter, Isabella, Harris; born April 17, 1695, who married, in 1736, Nicholas Fulgham, a grandson of the said 'Captain Fulgham'.
 

14.'Mr. Underwood' was Col. William Underwood, whose daughter, Anne, married Dr. James Williamson: 'James Williamson, married Anne Underwood, daughter of William Underwood, of Isle of Wight county. John Hammond dedicated to him his tract, 'Leah and Rachel'. He afterwards removed to Lancaster county, where he was one of the justices in 1652, but died before 1656, leaving two daughters, Margaret who married William Ball, Jr., and Mary who married John Rosier, Jr. (Virginia Biography, p. 360).

15. William Underwood Sr. married Margaret ..., who married (2) John Upton. The Will of John Upton shows that Margaret Underwood's daughter, Anne Underwood, married James Williamson. Anne Underwood was the sister of the William Underwood who married Elizabeth Moseley, who remarried to ... Coombes, as confirmed by William Underwood Jr.: 'I William Uderwood son and heir of William Underwood, Senr., late of Rappa. in Virginia in the parts of America Gent send greeting Know ye that I William Uderwood the sone have made & appointed my well beloved Uncle William Mosley* my Lawfull Guardian & attorney for me', recorded July 22, 1663 (Rappahannock Records, Vol. 1656-64, p. 342). Capt. John Upton in his will, prob. IOW, Dec. 16, 1652, left his land on the north side of Rappahannock River to his stepdaughters Elizabeth, Sarah, Margaret, and Anne Underwood, 'now the wife of Mr. James Williamson'. He also gave them '1,500 acres in Isle of Wight County, and likewise 850 acres if his son John Upton died before he reached the age of twenty-one years'.

16. *William Moseley was associated with George Yardley, baptised July 28, 1588, at St. Saviour, Southwark, ('son of Ralph'), who died in 1627, in Virginia. His wife was Temperance Flowerdieu, who after his death married Richard West, br. of Lord Delaware. On January 20, 1625, Captain Nathaniel Basse declared that 'John Coombes & John Ewyne cam over into this County in the good shipp caled Marigolde, Ano Domi 1619, the 20th of May, and were delivered by Capt. Lane to Sr. George Yardley to the Compenys use'. John Coombes was of St. Saviour, Southwark. George & Temperance's son, Francis, married Sarah Offley, her third husband, she having married (1) Adam Thorowgood, see anon. (2) John Gookin. By John Gookin, she had Mary Gookin, who m. (1) William Moseley, and (2) Anthony Lawson. Mary was the niece of Major General Daniel Gookin of MA. (see  Jester's Adventurers of Purse & Person, p. 185, 1964). The said Elizabeth Underwood married John Catlett, whose family were associated with the Taliaferro family Of St. olave's, Southwark:


17. Bartholomew Tallafer applied for residency in London on March 4, 1562, he described himself as a subject of the Duke of Venice. After moving to London, he married Joane Lane, on January 1, 1583.  He was buried, on September 22, 1601, at St. Olave's, Hart Street, London. Bartholomew's son, Francis Taliaferro, married Bennett Haie; their son, Robert Taliaferro, was baptised on November 19, 1626, at Stepney. He married Katherine Dedman, the daughter of Henry Dedman, who was granted 350 acres of land in Rappahannock River on June 27, 1650. On November 18, 1653, he was granted 400 acres in Lancaster County 'bounded with the land of Mr. James Bagnall and with another tract now in the possession of the said Dedman; 150 acres by right of a patent granted him for 350 acres June 27, 1650, which is relinquished to make this good, and 250 acres for the transportation of 5 persons'. After his death, his widow married the Rev. Charles Grymes. Francis Taliaferro was born in 1654, in Virginia, the eldest son of Robert Taliaferro and Katherine Dedman. He married Elizabeth Catlet, in 1685, the daughter of Col. John Catlet and his wife, Elizabeth Uderwood. A Grymes family are recorded in the registers of St. Olave's: Edward Grymes was baptised on June 7, 1622, son of christopher Grymes.

18. Margaret Underwood/Upton married, thirdly, Thomas Lucas: 'On April 10th, 1657, a pre-marital agreement was signed between Captain Thomas Lucas 'the elder' of Rappahannock in Virginia Gentleman ... and Margaret Upton late wife of Capt. John Upton deceased ... but if the said Margaret Upton shall happen to survive ... the said Col. More Fauntleroy (son-in-law of Samuel Griffin), and Capt. William Underwood and their heirs and administrator that all of the said estate shall return to her and said Margaret Upton'. The bond was for the sum of 12,000 pounds of tobacco executed to Col. More Fantleroy and William Underwood (Rappahannock Co. Wills, p. 33). In 1658, Mr. John Payne and Mr. John Catlett witnessed the noncupative will of Richard Lawson, brother of Epaphroditus Lawson, whose dau., Elizabeth, married Robert Payne of Rappahannock Co.(Rappahannock Court records). The interconnections of the Payne family of St. Olave's to those within this account shall be given hereinafter.

19. Thomas Harris of Surry Co. (obit. 1672) sold to Christopher Benn all the land at Pagan Point, purchased from William Batte and the aforementioned Mrs. Margaret Upton. William Batte was associated with the Powell family of St. olave's, Southwark: In October 1654, William Powell of the Parish of St.Saviour, Southwark, baker, appeared before the Mayor's Court to tesify that his elder brother William Powell had died in Virginia, without issue, and that his lands and plantations there should therefore descend to him. William, his younger brother. To corroborate his claim, he produced testimony from James Turner of the parish of St. Olave, Southwark, silkweaver, aged 61, and Ellen, aged 68, wife of John Austyn, of the parish, mealman. They testified that they were tenants of John Powell of St. Olave's parish, brewer, and his wife, Hester, both deceased, who had a son William who went to Virginia about 1612 and died there, as they had heard about 1634. They confirmed that the William Powell before the court was the younger brother and the true heir of the William Powell of Virginia,if the latter had no children. The court certified that, as William Powell the younger was unable to go in person to claim his brother's lands in Virginia, he had appointed William Hill of Smithe's Forge in Virginia as his Attorney. On January 12, 1657, further depositions were made in the Mayor's Court following inquires which had evidently been made in Virginia. Ellen Austyn, now a widow, aged 70, and Joyce, aged 53, wife of Richard Ball of St. Olave's, Southwark, citzen and cooper of London, were examined at the request of John White of London, merchant, and on behalf of William Batt of Virginia, gent. Their evidence repeated former testimony. It is very likely that William Powell the elder was the father of Alice Powell, who married Thomas Warren, of Ripple Court, Kent. Ann Gwaltney was born at Isle of Wight Co., c. 1652. She was the daughter of William Gwaltney and Alice Flake, daughter of Robert Flake and Margaret Marriott, grand-daughter of Thomas Warren and Alice Powell. Anne married Edward Boykin. These relationships were shared by the Newsam, Spencer, Sheppard, and Harris families of St. Olave's, as given hereinafter.

20. Depositions explain that both William Powells were so named after their godfather(s) and that William Powell the elder was 'at ye time of this deponent’s birth (William Powell the younger’s birth) was very dangerously sick in so much as his parents and friends did dispare his life, & for these reasons did also name him William'. (This was not an uncommen event). The relationship between the Powell brothers was given thus: 'To all Xtain (Christian) People to whom this Present Writtings shall come: Wee Wm Powell of Southwarke in the Countye of Surry England, Baker, administrator of the goodes & chattels, debts, rights & credits of Capt. Wm. Powell late of Chippoakes in the Collonye of Virginia his naturall Brother deceased, & heirs to (br.) George Powell, late whilest he lives at Chippokes aforesd since alsoe deceased also Wm. Parke  of Leadenhall Street in London, cheesemonger, & Ann my wife send greetings: Know ye that whereas me the said Wm. Powell … and Ann my wife have by writings under ye hands & seales bearing date the day of the date hereof Bargained and sold unto Wm. Batt of Chippoakes in Virginia afforesd Gente ... Written on parchment & Witnessed on the back of the same by these following: Fra. Gillowe, Arthur Bailey, John White, Robert Fox, Fra. Mayo. Attested by Ralph Dunstan & Sam Hubye'. Rec. ultimo Xber 1656'. One of the relationship of the Powells to the Harris family of St. Olave's is through the Griffins, that is, contemporary to John Powell was a Hugh Powell (ap Howell) of St. Olave's, who married Margaret Griffin, their son being William Powell (baptised in 1587, he being often confounded with his above decribed namesake), whose son was Griffin Powell, see registers. If John and Hugh Powell were closely related, then so were the Powells and Harris of Virginia.

21. As 'William Batt of Lower Chippoakes', he sold land, in 1658, at 'Rich Neck' (later the home of the Ruffins), to Ralph Jones. The deed recites that 275 acres was formerly patented by William Newsome, on March 3, 1636. On September 6, 1653, Henry Banister deeded to William Batt land which had been left to him by the last will of William Sheppard, and which was bought from Newsome in 1640 (Surry Deeds and Wills, 1645-72, p. 30.). In May 1666, Wiliam Ruffin and Robert Coleman patented 938 acres of land in Isle of Wight County adjacent to Thomas Harris, obit. 1688. The associations shared between two Thomas Harises of Isle of Wight, one dying in 1672, the other in 1688, are numerous, suggesting them to be closely related.

22. The Will of William Jewry (1651) bequeathed unto 'Robert Ruffin, son of William Ruffin of Isle of Wight County ... signed and deilvered in the presence of us Richard R. P. Penny, William R Ruffin (W.R.), William Westray' William Westwray's land in Isle of Wight County was mentioned in the patents of John Hardie, of date June 5, 1666 (as was the land of Captain Fulgham), of John Hardie, William Oldis and Robert Ruffin, of date September 21, 1674, of Henry Applewhaite, of date May 30, 1678, and of John Turner, Mathew Tomlin, and Thomas Harris, of date April 27, 1686. The Westraye family of St. Olave's had long been established there, and are recorded in the baptismal registers. John Hardy married Olive Council, in 1632, and had among other issue :John Jr., who made a Will probated on June 9, 1677, naming his wife, Alice Hardy, daughters, Olivia, who married Giles Driver, Lucy, wife of Hodges Council, and Deborah Hardy. It can be recalled that the Will of Ellen Harris, widow of Robert (para. 7), records a bequest to 'Margaret, eldest daughter of her cousin Isaac Driver, deceased, and his widow Barbara Driver; and their three other unnamed children'. Thomas Harris is he who died in 1688.

23. The first William Powell's plantation across the river from Jamestown was called Chippoakes. Essentially, the land holdings of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, who bought land from William Batte, and Thomas Harris, obit. 1688, whose land was adjacent to William Westraye, were determined by a shared association with the Griffin, Hart, Sheppard, Spencer, Newsome, Payne, and Powell families of St. Olave's, Southwark, which are now given, as follows:

24. The intermarried Spencer and Sheppard families of Virginia were of St. Olave's, Southwark, and are recorded thus: 1.'William & Alice Spencer' (married June 23, 1622), at St. Olave's, Southwark.  He had firstly married 'Elizabeth Curtice' , at St. Olave's, in 1616. William Spencer's nephew, Nicholas Spencer, of Bedfordshire, is recorded in the St. Olave's registers as being the father of John Spencer: 'John Spencer 26 September 1641 f. Nicholas Spencer'. John Spencer was the youngest son of Nicholas Spencer. On October 24, 1667 Nichols Spencer, Sr. bound out his son John to serve Captain William Cockerham for seven years. In a deposition given in 1675 in Surry County, Thomas Clay and his wife Elizabeth, aged 32 years, made deposition on 27 December last that Mr. John Spencer, of Lawnes Creek Parish, lay sick at William Hancock’s and Deponent asked him how he would dispose of his estate and he said he would leave what he had to his sisters Mary and Elizabeth. Robert Spencer was the eldest son of Nicholas, and, in 1660, he gave his age as thirty years in a deposition.  Robert Spencer is a link between the land formerly owned by Sergeant John Harris and the Thomas Harris who died in 1672: 'William Lea and Alice, his wife, to William Heath, 150 acres ... formerly Thomas Ffelton's, deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia commonly called Upper Chippoakes in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Morseleys (Moseley) adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry County from Charles Cittie County ... one hundred and fifteen acres of said land lyeth in Charles Cittie County adjoining unto the rest of the divident which lyeth in said surry County ... Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings'. Surry County Court Records. Recorded, November 10, 1660. In May of 1660, Thomas Harris, who died in 1672, appointed Thomas Culmore of Surry County as his attorney to receive of Robert Spencer all tobacco due him in that county. On November 5, 1666, the said Thomas Harris appointed his 'loving friend Robert Spencer' as his attorney in Surry County, to collect a debt owed by William Corker of that county. These records strongly indicate a relationship between the said Thomas Harris and John Harris, who died in 1686, in Surry County, as both had association with Robert Spencer. In a court case of November 28, 1649, a John Harris entered a plea against Thomas Pugh in which it is stated that that John Harris was demised land by Thomas Spencer, brother of Nicholas Spencer of Virginia, nephews of William Spencer. On January 21, 1638, Nicholas Spencer testified that John Lightfoot left his property to William Spencer (minutes of the Council and Gen. Ct. of Col. Va., p. 181). John Lightfoot was probably Alice Lightfoot's father, and therefore William Spencer's father-in-law. Only two daughters, Elizabeth, wife of Robert Sheppard, and Anne, wife of William Cockerham, seem to have survived him. Major Robert Sheppard and Captain William Cockerham of the Colonial Militia appear to have inherited his land. Surry County Records show that William Cockerham, son of Wm. Cockerham, made deed to '150 acres of land to Wm. Harris of Lownes Parish, county of Surry'. This land is described as 'part of a Pattn. for 1350 acres granted to Mr. Wm. Spencer, late of this county, of Feb. 10, 1637 and from said Spencer descended to me, the said Cockram', Signed William Cockerham, Jan. 4, 1685. Another record, of January 4, 1685, was an Indenture of '150 acres in Hog Island granted to Wm. Spencer, late of the County, dec'd February 1, 1637. Beginning at a marked white oak very neare a saw pitt in the line twixt said Cockerham and Robt. Barham, orphan, to the edge of the marsh of Hog Island Creek, east by a line dividing Cockerham and Wm. Sewards land, s and se by Jno. Case's cart path'. (For John and William Harris see hereinafter) 1.1. Elizabeth Spencer, m. (1) Major Robert Sheppard (bef. 1654) of James City, VA. He was very likely a son of 'Francis Shepheard and Elizabeth Ellis' (married September 28, 1617), St. Olave's Southwark. (2) Thomas Warren, of Ripple Court, Kent.

25. As will be shown, William Harris Jr., son of the testator of 1600, married a sister of 'John Shepeard of Southwark, grocer', who was undoubtedly related to Major Robert Sheppard. 1.1.1. Anne Shephard, m. (1) Thomas Hart & (2) William Newsome. The Will of John Hurt alias Hart, 'John, of St Saviour, yeoman', proved September 22, 1632, reveals him 'sick in body'; he asks to be buried in St Saviour church, and makes a bequest bequest to the poor of Clink Liberty ‘where I now dwell’. One of his legacies is a kiln standing beside his house, which is a source of income. Has a lease to grounds in Wapping. Family members named: Rebecca, his wife, Sara and Martha Hurt alias Hart, his daughters; Charles Hurt alias Hart, his brother, who is to manage the kiln; Hanna, his daughter by his wife Rebecca. Others named: Thomas Butler. Executor: Rebecca his wife. Overseers: Charles Hurt alias Hart; Thomas Butler; Andrew Lucas. Witnesses: Charles Hurt alias Hart; Thomas Butler; Andrew Lucas; Peter Newsam, scrivener (TNA, Prob.11/162, ff.243v-244r).

26. The Newsam family were established at St. Olave's. The Will of 'Francis Newsam, Haberdasher of Saint Olave Southwark', was proved on August 22, 1625 (TNA, PROB 11/146/319). His widow remarried John Reade: 'John Reade, of St Bride's, London, Haberdasher, & Anne Newsam, widow of Francis Newsam; at S'Leonard's, Foster Lane, London'. William Newsum Sr., of Virginia, was not a son of Francis and Anne Newsam, but their connection to Thomas Harris, born in 1636, is distinct: Anne Newsam was named in the Will of her father, Robert Leaning, proved January 21, 1621. It names children of Ann Leaning and Francis Newsam as 'Sara Newsam and Anne Newsam. Overseers: Thomas Leaninge, merchant, his cousin; George Garrard, grocer; Francis Newsam his son-in-law. Witnesses: Peter Newsam, servant to Edward Jackson, scrivener, and Henry Cawdry' (TNA, Prob.11/139, ff.11v-12r).

27. The said Peter Newsam, whose will was probated in 1625, witnessed to the Will of Richard Hinde, which was proved on December 12, 1625: 'Hynde, Richard, of St Saviour, citizen and salter of London'. His Will names Ann, his wife, John Hynde,* Richard Hynde, and William Hynde, his underage sons. Executor: Ann his wife. Witnesses: Nicholas Kinge; Peter Newsam, scrivener. Overseers: Stephen Streete of London, grocer; Ralph Yardly of London', who, as noted herein, was the father of Governor Yardley of Virginia (TNA, Prob.11/147, f). The Hinde family provided a link to the Bassanos of St. Olave's and St. Leonard's, and to the Salter Company, thus: 'Dorothie, dau. of Jo. Hinde of London', married Anthony Bassano II, as follows, whose second-cousin was Dorothy Bassano, who married, in 1662, as his second wife, Thomas Harris - ‘Thomas Harris, of S’ Leonard, East Cheap, Salter, Widr, ab’ 26, & Dorothy Bessana, of S’ Lawrence Jury, Spr, ab’ 19, her parents dead; consent of eldest brother John Bezana her guardian; at S’ Mary le Bow, London. 28 Feb 1662'. On February 20, 1638, Nicholas George, with John Grymsditch, received a 300 acre patent of land in IOW, on Pagan Creek. 200 acres to Nicholas by assignment from William Clapham to whom it was due for transportation of 4 persons. & 100 acres due sd. Grymsditch for the per. adv. of himself & wife (Virginia Patents Book 1, p. 633). John Grymsditch was a transportee of William Newsum, January 29, 1649 (Virginia Patents B. 2, p. 188). The relationships between William Clapham and the Payne family of St. Olave's is given hereinafter. It can be noted that 'Newsam' was variously written, one version being Newcome (see Sussex N&Q, vol. 11/12, p. 203), and it may be of considerable import that a Robert Harris married 'Margaret Newcom' on February 2, 1643, in St. Olave's.

28. 1.1.1.1. Alice Warren, m. Mathias Marriott. 1.1.1.1.1. Margaret Marriot, m. Robert Flake. 1.1.1.1.1.1. Alice Flake, m. William Gwaltney. (Thus, the connection of the Gwaltneys to this kinship group is established, n.b). 1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Anne Gwaltney, m. Edward Boykin, who patented 520 acres on the Blackwater in 1683. Arthur Allen (father-in-law of James Williamson), sold him 525 acres at Blackwater on August 9, 1692, and, on February 5, 1702, sold to Edward Boykin 'of the Upper Parish of Isle of Wight' one half of 800 acres of land in the Quit Rents of 1704. Edward Boykin's wife was evidently a daughter of William Gwaltney, Sr., whose Will was probated in Surry Co. on March 2, 1732 (B. 8, p. 257). William Gwaltney gave his 'Grandson Edward Boykin one cow', this being Edward Boykin, Jr., who returned an account of the estate of his father, Edward Boykin, in March 1730. John Boykin died soon after his father who had given him the plantation 'whereon I now live' and prior to settlement of his father, Edward Boykin, Sr.'s estate. John Boykin died intestate, as an inventory of his estate was appraised by Francis Williamson (          ), John Dunkley, and Edward Harris, and recorded February 23, 1729 (B. 3, p. 255). Edward Harris was evidently the son of ‘Thomas Harris, of S’ Leonard, East Cheap, Salter, Widr, ab’ 26, & Dorothy Bessana, of S’ Lawrence Jury, Spr, ab’ 19, her parents dead; consent of eldest brother John Bezana her guardian; at S’ Mary le Bow, London. 28 Feb 1662'. Edward's son was Nathan Harris, who married Catherine Walton in Brunswick Co., VA., daughter of George Walton (whose Will was witnessed by William Gwaltney, as follows, the great-grandson of William Gwaltney and Alice Flake), who was almost certainly a descendant of the Waltons of London and a Woodward heiress of St. Olave's, as decribed hereinafter.

26. Southwark was associated with the families of Bassano and Lanier: 1. ... 1.1. Antonio Bassano, 1511-1574, had a residence in Harte Street, St. Olaves, Southwark, m. Ellena Da Nazzi, 1515-1571. There is a present-day Bassano Street in Southwark. 1.1.1. Arthur Bassano.1.1.1. Anthony Bassano II. 1.1.1.1 Richard Bassano, witnessed Will of Clement Lanier’s mother-in-law. 1.2. Edward Bassano. 1.2.1. John Bassano, bapt. Nov. 6, 1608., obit. 1653, m. (1) (April 1, 1635) Anne Lloyd. PCC; Will proved Sept. 27, 1655. 1.2.1.1. Dorothy (Bassano) Harris, b. 1643, (named in Will of br. John), m. Thomas Harris. ‘Thomas Harris, of S’ Leonard, East Cheap, Salter, Widr, ab’ 26, & Dorothy Bessana, of S’ Lawrence Jury, Spr, ab’ 19, her parents dead; consent of eldest brother John Bezana her guardian; at S’ Mary le Bow, London. 28 Feb 1662. The Bassanos were also settled in St. Leoanard. 1.3. Lucretia Bassano, m. Nicolas Lanier, they lived in St Olave's Parish, Hart Street, Southwark. 1.3.1. Clement Lanier: the Will of Anne Carter, w., of London (P.C.C., Prob. 11/201, q. 189, Mar. 31, 1647; pr. Sept. 27, 1647, by Clement Lanyer and his wife Hannah, dau. of the deceased) is witnessed by Richard Bassano; a codicil, of June 8, 1647, is Witnessed by Richard Bassano and Jno. Crewe. 1.3.1. John Lanier. 1.3.1.1. John Lanier, m. (2) Sarah … 1.3.1.1.1. Nicholas Lanier, m. Mary Sheppard (almost certainly of the St. Olave's family). 1.3.1.1. John Lanier, m. (1) Katherine Sampson, in Charles City County, dau. of John Sampson. 1.3.1.1.1. Sampson Lanier Sr., b. 1682, Charles City, obit. May 5, 1743, Brunswick County, VA., m. Elizabeth Washington, dau. of Richard Washington* and Elizabeth Jordan. 1.3.1.1.1.1. Sampson Lanier, obit. Sept. 2, 1757, Brunswick County, m. Elizabeth Chamberlain 1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Rebecca Lanier, b. Dec. 16, 1744, d. Jul. 1818 in Green County, Georgia, m. Walton Harris, great-grandson (it is claimed) of Thomas Harris, obit. 1688.

27. The Walton family of London (later Rappahannock) intermarried with the Woodwards of St. Olave's, Southwark: 1. Christopher Woodward, bur. St. Olave, Southwark. On September 16, 1563, a Christopher Woodward, 'Citizen and Vintner of London' was one of the executors listed in the will (pr. December 13, 1563) of Henry Leke, 'citizen and clothworker of London, of St. Olyve's Southwerke'. He m. (2) Elizabeth Olbury, dau. of John Oldbury, of Shropshire. 1.1. Christopher Woodward, of Lambeth, m. (1) Catherine, dau of Thomas Audley of London; she m. (2) Robert Feltham, vintner, of St. Olave's, Southwark. Elizabeth Feltham of St. Thomas the Apostle, Southwark, co. Surrey, widow, made a Will dated August 14, 1620, stipulating that she is to be 'buried in churchyard of St. Olave, Southwark, in tomb where late husbands Christopher Woodward and Robt. Feltham lie' ... and naming 'Nichs. King; son-in-law Henry Walton; Thos. and Wm. (und. 24), sons of son Christr. Woodward, his daus. Eliz., Cath., Susan, Mary and Anne Woodward (und. 21); Henry and John Kyng, Saml. Walton and Eliz., wife of Robt. Long (all und. 24), chn. of dau., Susan Walton' (Proved November 27, 1620). (The following may be of some significance: 'William Lea and Alice, his wife, to William Heath, 150 acres....formerly Thomas Ffelton's, deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia commonly called Upper Chippoakes in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Morseleys (Moseley?) adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry County from Charles Cittie County ... one hundred and fifteen acres of said land lyeth in Charles Cittie County adjoining unto the rest of the divident which lyeth in said surry County ... Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings'. Dated, October 4, 1660. Surry County Court Records, Recorded, 10 November 10, 1660.


28. Christopher Woodward and Catherine Audley had issue: Thomas Woodward, whose Will was proved October 9, 1677,in IOW, naming wife Katherine; daughters Katherine, Elizabeth, Mary, Rachel, and Philarite; and sons Thomas and John; and stipulating: 'if my Sonn John hath left any Children in England I do give them Two full pounds apiece' ('Wills and AdminS', p. 17). His daughter, Anne Woodward, married Sir Henry Bromfield, sheriff of London, of the Southwark family connected to William Shakespeare. 1.1.1. Susan Woodward, m. (2) Henry Walton, of London. 1.1.1.1. 'Samuel Walton, of St Mary's Cray, in Kent, gentleman', Will proved April 9, 1631: 'to his cousin, Margaret Burrows, of Ashbourn, in the county of Derby, widow, and to his cousin, Matthew Andrews, of Mathfield, a gift of thirty shillings each; to Elizabeth Chatfield, of Bermondsey Street, in Southwark, wife of William Chatfield, twenty shillings; and he appointed his cousin, Henry Walton, of Whitechapel, citizen and haberdasher, his residuary legatee and sole executor. 'Henry Walton, of Whitechapel, citizen and haberdasher', was the father of Robert Walton OF Rappahannock, as noted here: 'By vertue of Letter of Attorney from Nicholas Andrews of Longdon Gent bearing date 15 Oct 1663 … in consideration of 400 lbs. Of Tobacco … to John Payne (see as follows for the significance of the Payne family of St. Olave's to other families of this account), of County of Rappa. 560 A of land by the within mentioned formerly sold and conveied to the said Nicholas Andrews by the said John Payne … he the said John Payne paying and performing the Rents and services thereof due … this 8th day of October 1666. s/Robert Walton. In presence of John Payne, Jr., Charles Mumford, Richard Payne, Abraham Comb, Thomas Parker' (Deed Abstracts of Old Rappahannock Co., Virginia, part I, 1672-1676). The first recorded Walton marriage in St. Olave's was between Richard walton and Joyce Holland, on December 2, 1605.

29. The Will of George Walton, of Brunswick County, probated January 26, 1767 (W.B. 3, 1751-1769, pp. 462-463) was presented in Court by John Walton, and Isaac Row Walton, his executors, and was proved by the oaths of William Ledbetter, and William Gwaltney. Legatees of George Walton, Gent were Wife, Elizabeth, and children: John Walton, Mary Ledbetter, Elizabeth Simms, 4. Catherine Harris, 5. Isaac Row Walton. William Gwaltney was a great-grandson of William Gwaltney and Alice Flake, thus, as given, a clear relationship is established to the various families of St. Olave's, from whence many of this account originated.

30. Dr. James Williamson was the brother of Robert Williamson: 'Appraisal of his Estate taken November 25, at the house of Mr. Robert Burnett. Divided between the relict and four orphans, by Robert Kae, Arthur Smith, Richard Sharpe, and Robert Flake ... Mr. Robert Burnett as marrying the relict of Robert Williamson gave bond for estate November 2, 1672. Security: Mr. Driver, and Mr. Arthur Allen' (D.B. 1, p. 9). Robert Williamson was the son of Richard Williamson (para. 9), whose estate was appraised by Thomas Griffin, cousin William Harris Jr. (para 2). Dr. James Williamson was the father of Henry Williamson: June 1688: 'Inventory and appraisal of Estate of Col. Leroy Griffin deceased. Henry Williamson and others to appraise and inventory Estate (Rappahannock Co. VA, Record Book, 1688-92, p. 74). Dr. James Williamson was the uncle of George Williamson: 'From George Williamson of Henrico County,cooper, John Williamson, Thomas Williamson, both of Isle of Wight, planters,Robert Exum of IOW, planter, and Patience, his wife, Elizabeth Joyner of IOW, widow, Julian Williamson of IOW, spinster, to Lewis Burwell, of James City County, Gentleman, 250 acres at or near a place called Blackwater Swamp including lands on the north side of the Blackwater Swamp joining lands lately purchased of the said George Williamson by Lewis Burwell (being part of 500 acres patented to Robert Williamson, uncle of the said George Williamson, and on 30 Oct 1686, 200 acres of the said 500 acres were sold to John Sojourner. The other part, 40 acres (sic) was sold by George Williamson, the father of the said George Williamson, and brother and heir of the said Robert Williamson to the said JOhn Sojourner on April 9, 1691. W: Elias Burt, John Clayton, Thomas Hardyman' (D.B. 4, p. 30). The Will of Dr. Robert Williamson, Doctor in Physic: 'to be buried as near as may be to my late deceased father in law Mr. Arthur Allen. (Col.) Leg: wife Jone, son Robert (under eighteen), land at Blackwater sons: George, Arthur, and Francis Friends: Major Nicholas Hill, and Capt. John Grove, Executors in Trust. Son: Robert Executor, Reg. May 2, 1670. Witness: John Hardy, William Sherwood. John Sojourner Jr. (ibid.).  On January 23, 1690, he patented 162 acres of land, formerly that of Nathanial Bacon, adj. Robert williamson, James Atkinson, and Edward Boykin, for transportin 4 persons not named. The same day, John Sojourner and his wife, Mary, assigned the patent to John Dill, witnessed by John Davis and John Harris, the son of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672. Richard Sharpe's Will, of January 15, 1699,  names Anne Harris; the Will of Thomas Harris, obit. 1688, names 'Ann Harris' and 'Mrs. Ann Sharpe'.

30. William Harris, the 'underage son' (para. 2) married Elizabeth Stanlie, on February 20, 1602, in St. Olave, Southwark. Their son was William Harris Jr., as follows: 'Peter Pope, notary public, in Rotterdam, Holland. That John Shepeard of Rotterdam appoints 'his well beloved brother Wm Harris' to receive ac/s from Wm. Underwood or James Williamson, merchants, living in Virginia, particularly for all goods delivered the said Williams ... in the absence of Underwood ... late end of the year 1648' (Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts). The Lancs. Co. Levy, February 6, 1654, indicated groups of Neighbours: 'Mr William Underwood to rec. for 26 tytheables ... Jo. Sherlock ... Mr Williamson ... Tho Robinson'. John Sherlock was associated with Dr. James Williamson: 'John Sherlock, 200 acres Lancaster Co., 15 Nov. 1653. In Rappa. Riv., on the head of a devdt. of land formerly surveyed for Mr. James Williamson, lyeing on Totaskey Creek, running N.E. by N. by the creek side to a small branch dividing this & the land allotted to the Rappahanock Indians. Transportation of 4 persons: Judith Holliman, ... Holliman, Robert Sutton, Christopr Holliman (D.B. 3, p. 251).

31. The Holman and Sherlock families of St. Olaves, Southwark, are variously recorded: The Will of William Sherlocke (had a son named John), Yeoman of Saint Saviour Southwark Surrey. December 10, 1663. PROB 11/312/487: Bennett v Leake. Plaintiffs: Thomas Bennett. Defendants: Henry Leake, Edward Bromefield, Richard Holman. Subject: messuage and brewhouse near Battle Bridge in St Olave's, Southwark, Surrey. 1603-1625: 'William Holman & Margaret Kelham, June 23, 1617' (married).

32. The said Christopher Holman had a son and namesake, the father of John Holman, who is mentioned in this sale: 'John Proctor of isle of Wight to Roger Delk of Surry County sold 140-acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp being land taken up by said Proctor on February 12, 1742, adjoining John Holman, Thomas Holman, Benjamin Pittman, Joseph Griffin and Robert Mercer. Signed John Proctor. Witnesses: Laurence Lancaster, Solomon Delk and Joseph Griffin. Recorded January 28th, 1744. (D.B. 7, p. 13). Laurence Lancaster was the son of Samuel Lancaster, who married Elizabeth Harris, daughter of John Harris and his wife, Unity; John Harris being mentioned in Surry Co. Court Records on August 26, 1686: 'Jury finds that John Harris, late school master is dead'. John Harris: Estate by Unity Harris, widow and administratrix of John Harris. May 3, 1687. Signed Wm. Newsums, John Clarke, Wm Newitt' (D.B.3, p. 82). The first Clarke marriage recorded at St. olave's was between 'Richard Clarke and Elizabeth Powell', in 1654, no day given.

33. John Clark, son of John Clark, obit. 1672, devised in his Will, probated May 15, 1717, that his 'daughter and her husband have the plantation they live on for life then to my grandson, John Barham. If he have no heirs, to granddaughter, Elizabeth Barham. He devised to  grandson, Robert Barham, 'land bought of James Briggs'. He mentions Edward Harris.* Witnesses: Thos. Lane, Wm. Holt (B. 7, p. 65). Edward Harris may have been the orphan of Thomas Harris, son of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, and husband of Judith (Edwards) Harris, stepmother of Edward, who married John Clarke Sr. Robert Barham and Elizabeth Clark had issue: (1) Thomas Barham, who married Sarah Newsom, granddaughter of William Newsom. (2) Charles Barham, whose son, James Barham, married Mary Thorpe, they the parents of Martha Barham, who married Joel Harris, who reasonably can be  adduced a descendant of the Harris family of St. Olave's. The will of Edward Harris, dated August 26, 1739, named legatees: son Edward, land on the Blackwater; son Lewis, land on Three Creeks which I bought of John Dortch; son Joel; son Amos; son Hardy; daughter Mary; daughter Ann; wife Ann. Timothy Thorpe and Owen Mirick to divide the land between sons Joel and Amos. Executors wife, and son, Edward Harris. Witnesses: Nathaniel Ridley & Timothy Thorpe. Recorded September 22, 1740. *Edward Harris may have been the orphan of Thomas Harris, son of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, and husband of Judith (Edwards) Harris, stepmother of Edward, who married John Clarke Sr. Robert Barham and Elizabeth Clark had issue: (1) Thomas Barham, who married Sarah Newsom, granddaughter of William Newsom. (2) Charles Barham, whose son, James Barham, married Mary Thorpe, they the parents of Martha Barham, who married Joel Harris.

34. The Barhams were associated with Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, as he was co-overseer of the Will of William Ridley, whose sister, Elizabeth, was the probable wife of Charles Barham, who, with Capt. William Cockerham patented 850 acres in Surry Co., Va., southwest of the third swamp of the Blackwater, for the transportation of 18 persons, in 1666 (B. 6, p. 650). As will be shown, William Harris Jr. was a contemporary of John Harris, whose son was recorded in the registers of St. olave's, Southwark: 'William Harris, 6 June 1641, f. John Harris'. John Harris is likely to be he who was associated with Nicholas Spencer, of St. Olave's, Southwark, and his son, William, is likely to be he who was associated with William Cockerham and Robert Barham. William Cockerham was most likely a kinsman of the Harris family of St. Olave's through Sheppard family intermarriages.

35. They Barhams were also associated with the family of Hart, which would have been a primary point of Connection with families eminating from St. Olave's: On July 3, 1695, 'Robert Barham orphan of Capt. Charles Barham, being now in court and having no settled place to live is being gone from Thomas Binns whith whom he lately dwelt, and the said Binns refusing to take him again, at his request he is placed with Robert Hart, who promiseth to give him 2 months schooling each year.. and provide his maintenance, etc.'(B.2, p. 95). Thus, it is possible that Robert Hart married Priscilla Barham, daughter of Capt. Charles Barham, and sister to orphan Robert Barham.

36. On October 25, 1670, Robert Flake made a deed of gift of a mare to his daughter Elizabeth wife of John Clark (B. 2, p. 89). On May 21, 1712: 'Jury to determine boundaries of land of Robert Flake, Robert Barham, Thomas Lane, William Holt, William Ruffin, Janes Brutton, Edward Brown, William Little, John Sugar, Arthur Davis, John Phillips, and Hustis Grimes (ibid., p. 105). A complimentary St. Olave connection here is to Robert Flake, and, more specifically to his wife. The first Grymes marriage recorded at St. Olave's was between 'Wylliam Grymes and Alice Hewett', on November 13, 1580. 

37. Samuel Lancaster was the son of Robert Lancaster, as recorded thus: November 29, 1679: A patent was given to William Powell of Isle of Wight County, for land on a branch of the Nansemond River. His Grant was given for the transportation of six persons: John Davies, Elizabeth Brisly, Edward Welbank, Thomas Davies, Robert Lancaster, and Richard Miller. The will of Thomas Powell, father of the said William, probated on February 9, 1687, names legatees Thomas, Nathaniel, William, and John Powell, daughter-in-law Elizabeth Powell, daughter-in-law Lucretia Corbett, Roberta and Elizabeth Powell, and states that his son Willaim is to be executor. Witnesses: Thomas Griffin and Francis Hutchins. (See 'Wills and Admins', B. 1, p. 40). It being witnessed by Thomas Griffin strongly suggests that that Thomas Powell was of the Powells of St. Olave's, Southwark.

38. The Lancaster and Harris families continued their association: 'Lawrence Lancaster to Len Henley Bullock for 39 pounds 8 shillings sold 330-acres on Fishing Creek, Elbe's Branch, where I now live adjoining West Harris, Lewis Patterson, William Rowland, and John Burch'. Witnesses: Samuel Lancaster, Briton Harris, and John Lancaster. Proved by Briton Harris, Bute, November Court, 1764. (see Kerr, Bute (Warren) Co., NC, Abstracts (1764-1766),Deed Book A, p. 77). The Will of William Williford names Wife, Mary, and gives 'to son Beulah the plantation bought of my brother, Thomas Williford', and 'to son Johnson, the land my father purchased of Lawrence Lancaster, which I possess by virtue of my father's will'. Witnesses: M. Holloman, Mrs. Boykin, and William Holloman. Registered August 14, 1783 (Southampton Co., VA, Wills & Estates, 1749-1800. p. 27). Bute, August Court, 1800: 'Account in Estate of Laurence Lancaster deceased by William, Laurence & John Lancaster executors. Paid: for coffin and sickness John Hall (fee), B. Moss (taxes & sale), Samuel Williford, John Lancaster, Claiborne Harris, Len Kimball, Ben Kimball, R. Bobbitt, Geo. Pegram, H. Harris, Jesse Bell, Wm. Johnson and executors of Harton. Recorded from sale, etc. & balance to be divided among twelve legatees'. The association of 'Mrs. Boykin' reflects the Boykin/Gwaltney connection to families eminating from St. Olave's, which, almost certainly, included that of Holman. 
 

39. William Harris Jr. married a sister of John Shepeard (TNA,PROB 11/318/482, Will of John Shepheard, Grocer of Southwark, November 14, 1665), they being partners of George Baldero, 'merchant of London' (c. 1603-1666), who deposed (HCA 13/71) on May 29th, 1656 in the case 'On the behalfe of Henry Baldero, William Harris and John Shephard English Merchants touching the shipp the Catherine, John Thompson Master'. George Baldero noted 'hee [Henry Baldero] hath by lettres ordered this deponent to accept bills from Newcastle to pay moneys for the lading of coales there for holland upon and for the account of him and the sayd part owners mr harris and mr shephard, and owners of the said vessell, and coales' (HCA 13/71 f.210v) George Baldero was born in the parish of 'Berry in the county of Suffolk', as was Henry Boldero, who was later resident in Dordrecht. Other Prerogative Court of Canterbury sources suggest that this was Bury St. Edmunds, with the Boldero family name seen in both Bury St. Edmunds and the nearby parish of Fornham St. Martin, both in Suffolk. He was a resident in parish of Saint Olaves Hart Street between at least 1651 and 1664. To repeat, It is very likely  that the said 'John Shepeard' was closely related to the Sheppard family of Virginia.

40. There were also several Edward Harrises recorded of St. Olave's, Southwark, one of whom may have been associated with John Payne, of Southwark, London, and Rappahannock, Virginia: 'John Paine, 88 acs. Lancaster Co., 20 Feb. 1662, N. side of Rappa. Riv., abutting N. & by W. upon land of Edward Harris, dec'd., S. by E. upon a Cr. dividing this from land of Richard Coleman. Granted to Rice Jones 2 Sept. 1652, sold to Howell Powell & George Harris, who assigned to Charles Snead & by him assigned to sd. Paine (C&P 5, p. 487). A clue as to one such Edward Harris of St. Olave's is contained in the Will of Francis Grove, of St. Saviour, Southwark, proved September 4, 1645, requesting him to be buried near the body of his unnamed daughter. He bequests to the poor of St Saviour parish. His dwelling in St Saviour is called the Golden Key. Has property in Sheepyard [sic] in St Saviour parish; also in Croydon, and in Pulborough, Sussex and Rainham, Kent. He names Elizabeth his wife, to have all his household goods ‘except my bookes’. Adam Grove and Henry Grove his brothers; Henry's son Francis Grove; Henry's other children, unnamed. Frances Grove and Mary Brewer his sisters. Others named: The unnamed children of Richard and Anne Gibbins. Raph Gibbins. The unnamed children of John Brewer (perhaps husband of Mary Brewer). Richard Cleyton his servant. Mr Butler, preacher. Nathaniel White and his unnamed son. Mr Spencer, minister. The unnamed children of Captain Moore. Serjeant Scutch. Serjeant Tarrenter. Mrs Whitcher his mother-in-law. Executor: Henry Grove his brother. Overseers:  George Moore esquire; George Hunt; John Brewer; Edward Harris (TNA, Prob.11/194, f.17r). Given a connection to a family of Gibbins, the Will of John Gibbins, proved September 25, 1721,of Isle of Wight Co., may be of some relevance: 'Gibbins, John. Leg. - Mr William Kinchin, Henry Harris, Mathew Harris, Mary Adkins, the daughter of James Adkins, John Jackson, Thomas Harris, the son of Edward Harris, Robert Harris. Ex. Mr William Kinchin. Wit. Edward Chitty, Edward Harris' (Chapman, 'Wills and Admins', B. 1-3, p. 87). Given such 'alignment', might it be possible for these Harris to be related to Edward Harris, overseer of the will of Francis Grove, associated with a family of Gibbins? Mr. Brayton ('Five Thomas Harrises of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, p. 116, 1995), states that Mathew and Robert Harris were probably sons of Robert Harris: Will of Robert Harris, Isle of Wight Co., pr. 1740 -  'I give unto my sons Robert, John, Michael, Charles, Joseph, James and Mathew all my Smiths tools to be equally devided amongst them' ... Signed & Sealed in P'sence of John Dunkley, Josiah John ('O his mark') Holliman'(ibid. B. 4, pp. 266-267). Thus, a connection is established between the said Robert Harris and the Holman (Holliman) family, they connected to the aforementioned William Harris, he connected also to the Underwood, Williamson, and Sherlock families (para. 30).

41. Whatever the caveat about cousins marrying into the same families, and whatever others have claimed for John Harris, son of Robert Harris, the testator of 1740, it is most reasonable to assume him to be he who married Avis ..., given extant Harris deeds: 1737-8. 'Land from Edward Boykin of North Carolina to Robert Harris, Jr. of Isle of Wight County, VA for 5 lbs about 50 acres on south side of Blackwater and bounded on east side by Berbeckew branch, line between Robert Harris, Jr. and part of paten of 325 acres granted to the said Boykin on 25 August 1731. Witness: John Washington, Arthur Williamson, Joseph Williamson'(D.B. 5, p. 252). February 28, 1759. Southampton County: 'Robert Harris & wife Ann of North Carolina to Burwell Williamson of Southampton County'. Deed of Bargain & Sale, proved October 11, 1759, '125 acres adj. John Harris, Thomas Holloman, Banbergan Branch, and Joseph Williams, a certain tract or parcel of land containing one hundred & twenty five Acres S: Robert Harris and Ann Harris, Witnesses James Harris, John Kitchen, Matthew Harris, and Mary Harris' (D.B.2, 1753-1760, pp. 289-290). John Harris wills land to son Benjamin: 'I give and bequeath to my loving wife Avis Harris the use of my Land and plantation whereon I now live during her life and after her decease I give my said land to my son Benjamin Harris forever but in case my son Benja depart this life in his non-age or without lawful issue of his Body then I give this said land to my son Joel Harris and his heirs forever ... I give to my Loving wife Avis Harris all the remainder of my estate not heretofore mentioned to her and her heirs forever ... I constitute and appoint my son Howel Harris my whole Executor of this my last will and testament revoking and making void all former wills by me made. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this 11 day of May Anno Dom 1771. John X Harris (Seal), mark Arthur Holleman, Micajah Holleman, William Holleman. At a Court held for the County of Southampton the 11 day of Feb 1773 this will was presented in Court by Howel Harris'. On January 21, 1786, Ben and Elizabeth Harris sell land to Burwell Williamson in Southampton County: 'Two hundred eight acres more or less and bounded as follows: Begining at a cedar a corner of the said Harris's and William Williamson deceased, Thence southeast by South sixty seven pole to a hickory thence south eighty two degrees East forty four pole to a gum by the side of the piney branch thence up the various courses of the run of the said branch to a small sweet gum, a corner of Harmon Harris's land, thence south eighty seven degrees East seventy pole to a pine, thence North thirty seven Degrees East fifty two pole to a sweet gum, thence north fifteen degrees west twenty eight pole to a small white oak, thence north twenty one degrees west thirty two pole to a pine Harman Harris's Corner thence north thirty four degrees west to a Spanish oak a corner of the said Harriss's and Williamson lands, thence by a line of marked trees divideing line between the said Benjamin Harris and Said Burwell Williamson to a black gum, a corner of the said Burwell Williamson, Benjamin Harris, and William Williamson deceased thence along the said William Williamsons line to the begining, seventy five acres of the above said land being part of a patent granted Robert and John Harris, bearing date the 8th day of September 1720 ...'. 

42. William Harris Jr. was a contemporary of another William Harris, who, at St. Olave, Southwark, married (May 25, 1643) Elizabeth Arnell, who was very likely related to Anthony Arnell (Arnold), and they to Richard Arnold of London, a grantee of Arms in 1611, and member of the Haberdasher’s Company. The above mentioned Arms - Gules three pheons Argent on a chief of the last bar nebule Azure and for the Crest, a demi tiger Sable seme of bezants holding in his paws a broad arrow Gules feathered and headed Argent -  were also entered in an official funeral certificate of 28 July 1621 for the above Richard Arnold “gentlemen and free of the Haberdashers” who died 22 July 1621 and was buried at St. Martins within Ludgate, London' (A. Colin Cole, Windsor Herald of Arms).


43. Anthony Arnell was a transportee of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672: March 2, 1658: 'Thomas Harris, 1000 acres, Isle of Wight Co. Upon a swamp running into the W. branch of Nansamond Riv., including 2 Indian fields. Trans. of 20 persons: John Hardy, Alexander Vaughn, Ann Lees, William Todd, Eliz. Jones, Mary Wood, John Davis, John Griffin, Fran. Anderson, Jno. Pew, Ann Greene, Eliza. Nusome, Weltin Harris, Anth. Arnold, Sam. Trobury, Alexander Cahill (Nugent, 'Cavaliers and Pioneers', Vol. 1, p. 386). Anthony Arnell (Arnold) is confounded with another family of Harris in that he is recorded as living in Christopher Harris’ house. This was solely consequential to the late wife of Christopher Harris being the stepdaughter of Nathaniel Bacon, son of Rev. James Bacon and Martha Woodward, daughter of George Woodward and Elizabeth Honeywood. Thomas Woodward of St. Olave's came to Virginia, declaring that he would not see England again, until the King's return. In Sept 1649, Captain Norwood brought on his ship, 'Virginia Merchant', a group of Royalists escaping Cromwell, including Maj. Francis Morrison and Maj. Francis Fox of London. Also on board was Sir Phillip Honeywood, who 'had some relatives' then living in Isle of Wight County', they being: Thomas Woodward, and Colonel Nathaniel Bacon.  The first Hardie marriage recorded at St. Olave's was between 'Richard Hardie and Ann Butler', on April 27, 1620.

44. The link between Anthony Arnell and the Griffin-Harris-Williamson kinship group of St. Olave's, Southwark, is evidenced in these grants: August 23, 1669: 'John Cape, 830 acres New Kent Co. On North West side of Westopher (sic) Path adj. Mr. Math. Hill, to dividing line between this and James City Co., crossing a branch of ... along Mr.Thomas Marston, Mr. Booth, Lt. Col. Henry Gooch, the Rumney Marsh, Mr. Thomas Brereton and Anthony Arnold; 30 acres on East side of sd. Marsh adj. sd. Brereton and Wm. Griffin. Transport of 17 persons, named' (Nugent, 'C&P', Vol. II, pp. 59-60). September 1, 1669: 'Richard Bridgate and James Fossett, 750 acres in Rappahannock Co. James Fossett formerly sold one half of this land, now the said Thomas Williamsons being the predecessor of the Estate of Richard Hubbert hath sold 375 acres to James Fassett and 'full consent of Kate Hubbert now mylawful wife. Wit: Anthony Arnold, John (x) Forth' (Rappahannock Co. B. 4, p. 191). Anthony Arnold was associated with William Edwards: October 14, 1670; Whereas Willm. Richardson in his life tyme delivered unto Capt. George Lydall a list of bills as under his hand appears amounting to 12,000 pounds of tobacco and caske wch he was to retorne or be accomptable for it and it appearing that there was a bill of 3,000 pounds Tobo in the said list due from Mr. Arnold wch belonged to the orphans of Wm. Edwards decd.' (McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, p. 230).


45. He was also associated with William and John Harris: March 24, 1726: 'William Harris, Junr., 1500 acres, New Land, Hanover Co., adj. Mrs. Arnold and George Woodroof’s lines; on Overton’s fork of Elk Creek (Nugent, C&P, Vol. III, p 303). April 11, 1732: 'John Harris, 400 acres New Land, Hanover County; adj. Ambrose Joshua Smith, Capt. Thomas Carr and Ann Arnold; on low side of Great Rockey Creek (ibid. p. 414). John Harris of Cedar Creek, who died before 1745, established the Quaker Meeting with John Stanley in 1721, it being assumed that he married Mary Stanley, John Stanley's daughter. It has been noted that the Harris of St. olave's had intermarried with a family of Stanley. William and John Harris, neighbours of Mrs. Arnold, were both perhaps the sons of William Harris (and 'Hennerettah'), and he the son of William Harris and Elizabeth Arnold, of St. Olave's, Southwark., but, as said, such speculation is futile.

46. 'William Harris, junr.', aforesaid is recorded thus: 'Wm Harris and wife, Hennerettah, of parish of Fredericksville, Louisa, deed to Martin Baker of Hanover, for good causes, thereunto moving, part of tract granted by patent March 24, 1725 unto William Harris, and by said William given said Wm. Harris, his son, in will recorded (prior to 1734) in Hanover Co. (Louisa Co., Va, B. 2, p. 298). William Harris, the grantee of 1726, was 'William Harris, Gent., 76 acs. (NL), Hanover Co; beg. at James Glen's corner; to N. side the Little River; on the Newmarket line; 24 Mar. 1725, 10 Shill.' (ibid. p. 389). He was also recorded thus: 'Capt. William Harris, Gent., 266 acs. (NL), Hanover Co; beg. at Thomason's line on S. side the Little River, at mouth of Byars' Branch; on New Market lines; 24 Mar. 1725, 30 Shill.' (ibid., p. 420). Hanover Court Records, 1733-1735, p. 9, record: 'At a Court held for Hanover Co. 2 Nov. 1733. on petition of James Overton it is ordered that John Kimbro Sen., George Berry, John Henson and John Harris or any three of them being first Sworn do value the buildings, works and Improvements with Regard to expenses on 400 acres of land belonging to the petitioner on branches of the south fork of the Little River in this Co. and that they make Report to the next Court'.

47. James Overton is recorded thus: 'James Overton, 400 acs. (new lease), Hanover Co.; on N. side the S. fork of Elk Cr.; on John Raglin's line; 20 Feb 1723, 40 shill' (Nugent, C&P, vol. 3, p. 259). A James Overton appears in the Vestry Book of St. Paul's Parish: 'At a Vestry held at Mr Wm Harris's 9br ye 6th 1722 ... Mr. James Overton was this day Admitted a vestry man for this Parish, and had the usual Oaths Administer'd by Majr Nicho Meriwether one of his Majesty's Justices of the peace, & likewise signd the Test'. The convergence of Harris and Overton has led to the speculation that James Overton was the father of  William Overton, who married his first cousin, Jemima Harris, daughter of Temperance (Overton) Harris and her husband, William Harris, the 'Captain', 'Gent', aforementioned.

48. The first Arnold of this family recorded in Virginia was Robert: 'Robt. Arnold transported 1637, headright claimed by William Spencer, county not named'(ibid., vol. 1, p. 81). These Arnolds were associated with Matthew Tomlin - and he with the Thomas Harris who died in 1688 -  'Jane Arnold transported 1686, headright claimed by Mathew Tomlin, Isle of Wight County' (ibid. Vol. II, p. 299). Anthony Arnold was executed for his part in Bacon's Rebellion: 'Phillip Lightfoot, Esqr., 525 acres, New Kent County; commonly called the Doctors Field; on the Draggon Swamp, 28 Apr. 1690. Whereas Anthony Arnold, late of New Kent County; did purchase of one John Pigg, 525 acres commonly called the Doctors Field, on the Draggon Swamp, being the moyety of 1050 acres granted said Pigg & Jno.Maddison, 4 July 1664; to be held by said Arnold & his heirs for ever, as by deed dated 24 Feb. 1664, & recorded in said County Court; by vertue whereof said Arnold was seized in his demesne as of fee of & in the said 525 acres, & being so seized said Arnold committed Rebellion & high treason & was legally convicted & executed, & legally attained by Act of Assembly, 8 June 1680, whereby all his estate, both reall & Personall, became forfeited to his Majesty; and Whereas Phillip Lightfoot, Esqr., hath made composition for the said land & paid what by the Charter, Law & custome of Virginia is required in such cases, Know yee, &c. Petition of said Lightfoot to President & Council, 19 Oct. 1689. Composition paid Mr. Auditor Byrd, &c.' (ibid., p. 349).

49. William Harris Jr. was also a contemporary, as stated, of John Harris, whose son was recorded in the registers of St. Olave's, Southwark: 'William Harris, 6 June 1641, f. John Harris'. John Harris is likely to be he who was associated with Nicholas Spencer, of St. Olave's, Southwark, and his son, William Harris, is likely to be he who was associated with William Cockerham and Robert Barham; the land therein mentioned was deeded to Harris Taylor, grandson of William Harris, to John Holt, February 20, 1738. John Spencer, obit. 1708, son of Nicholas Spencer Jr. is linked to Joseph Taylor: Spencer, John, of Nominy, gent. ... '200 acres of land to Joseph Taylor, planter; son Nicholas Spencer 350 acres of land; daughter Frances Spencer land adjoining son Nicholas; wife Mary exx' (proved August 28, 1708). Another possibility, given the close connection of Robert Spencer, son of Nicholas, to lands formerly owned by Sergeant John Harris (see notes: Sergeant John Harris), is that the said John Harris was a son of Sergeant Harris.

50. Frances Spencer was married to a John Harris, as recorded thus: 'This indenture made the twenty eight day of March in the thirteenth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George ... of one part and John Cooper and Hannah his Wife of the same Parish and County of the other part; Witnesseth that John Ariss and Frances his Wife in consideration of the sum of five pounds Sterling money to them in hand payed, the receipt whereof they do hereby acknowledge, hath and by these presents doth bargain and sell unto John Cooper and Hannah his Wife one certain tract of land being an Island scituate in the Mouth of Nominy River commonly called known and distinguished by the name of Virgins Island. containing by estimation five acres be the same more or less, it being next and adjoining to the tract of land now in the possession of said John Ariss and Frances his Wife wch; descended to her the sd. Frances from her Father, Mr. John Spencer, together with all priviledges comoditys and appurtenances unto the sd. Island belonging; and the rents issues and profits thereof; To have and to hold the Island tract of land containing five acres with all right title & demand of John Bushrod Ariss and Frances his Wife to John Cooper and Hannah his Wife dureing the natural life of the sd. Hannah and after her decease to the proper use of John Bushrod, Eldest Son of sd. Hannah. and his heirs; and John Arris and Frances his Wife their heirs shall warrant and for ever defend; In Witness whereof the partys to these presents have Interchangeably set their hands & affixed their seales the day & year first above written. Sealed & Delivered in presence of us: WM. Paine. Tho. Poindexter, John Ariss, Saml. Mannin, Frances Ariss'. At a Court held for the sd. County the 27th day of March 1728 (Westmoreland Co., Deeds and wills B.8., p. 93).

51. The son of John Arris (Harris) was his namesake, who deceased in 1730: 'In the name of God, Amen. I John Ariss of Westmorland County in the Parish of Cople being now in perfect helth sence and memory thanks be to God for it and calling to mind the unsartanty of this transitory life ... Item. I give and bequeath to my Son, Spencer Ariss, my Negro man, George, & my Negro woman, Jene, them and thear increse to him and his hears lawfule begoten of his body and for want of such hears, to my Son, John Ariss, to him & his hears lawfule begoten of his body ... Item. I give to my darter, Elizabeth Ariss ... a pare of Gold Bobs, one Gold Ring, a pare Silver Clasps and all her Mothers wearing aparrel. Item. I give to my darter, Frances Ariss, ... a pare of Gold Bobs, a pare of Silver Studs ... item. I give my Son, Spencer Ariss, my young spade mare, sadel and bridel. Item. I give to my Son, John Ariss, ye horse colte that come of my white mear and my Cane & Gune and my Grate Bible ... Lastly, I do appoint my frend, Jno Footman, and Mr. Wharton Ransdell, Exrs. of this my Last Will and Testament, whearof I have set my hand and fixed my seal this 13th day of March 1729 (ibid., p. 129). This lineage patently stems from the intermarriages of the Harris, Spencer, and Sheppard families of St. Olave's, Southwark.

52. Ariss was born in Westmoreland County in 1725, but by 1743 his father was dead and Ariss apparently chose his brother Spencer Ariss as his guardian. Subsequently Ariss may have been sent to England for schooling because his return from England is noted in 1751. In 1755, Ariss moved to nearby Richmond County, and in 1767 he moved again, this time to Fauquier County. Ariss was a longtime friend of General George Washington, to whom he rented his home. Some also believe that Ariss had a role in designing the Washington home at Mount Vernon. The relationship between the two families was of long standing: Ariss was the great-grandson of Col. Nicholas Spencer of Cople Parish, Westmoreland, who had patented the Mount Vernon estate with his friend Lt. Col. John Washington.

53. A Payne family were also associated with Southwark: The Will of 'John Payne, of St Saviour, citizen and fishmonger of London', proved July 29, 1608, requests burial in St Saviour church, near his late wife Anne (Floode). He bequests to the poor of St. Saviour parish; to St Thomas Hospital in Southwark ... a house in Thames Street, formerly his father's dwelling house, now occupied by one Hubbard, grocer. Family members named: Margaret Bromfield his daughter, and her children John Bromfield and Anne Bromfield. Thomas Bromfield his brother. Grace Bromfield his sister ... Richard Walthall his cousin, the son of his sister Dutton. John Payne his brother-in-law  ... Anne Taylor his sister. Mrs Overman and Mrs Paginton, the daughters of Thomas Bromfield ... The children of William Benn, ‘sometymes a Cheapeman of Havant’. Executor:  Edward Bromfield his son (in-law). Overseers: Richard Walthall, citizen and mercer, and Thomas Overman, leatherseller. Witnesses:  Melch. Francis; Richard Walthall; John Payne; Margaret Bromfield; Anne Payne (TNA, Prob.11/112, ff.95r-96r). This is the same family of Bromfield associated with the Woodwards of St. Olave's. William Benn may have had some association to whom Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, purchased land from.

54.The Will of 'George Payne (son of John Payne, the above noted brother-in-law) of St Saviour, citizen and grocer of London'), proved August 17, 1625, also requests burial in in St Saviour parish, ‘neare where my Children do lye’, and a bequest to the poor of St Saviour parish ‘where I nowe dwell’. Has a house and lands in Brasted, Kent. Has a house in Gracechurch Street, London, occupied by Owen Kynastone. He has two houses in St Saviour, one occupied by Mr Humfrey, the other occupied by John Burbage. Family members named: Margaret, his wife, John Killingbecke, his cousin, his sister Bray, and her sister ... Bishe; George Cheeseman, his cousin; Elizabeth Botley, his wife's niece, daughter of Thomas Botley deceased; George Paine and Edward Payne his sons, and another son, John ‘who is nowe beyonde the sea’.

55. This John Payne went to Virginia with the 2nd supply of Gov. Yardly (of Southwark). The Will of Ralph Yardley, Merchant Tailor of London,  proved February 27, 1603, bequests: '1/3 to wife, Rhoda, 1/3 shared between children: Raphe, George, John, Thomas, Ann. To be paid to sons at age 21, to daughter at 21 or marriage, whichever first. Final 1/3 to be shared: poor of St. Saviors, Southwark, London; those merchant tailors who attend his burial; 'to my sister, Palmer, a ring of gold to the value of 6 shillings, 8 pence; and to my cousin John Palmer, her husband a like ring of the like value, and to my daughter Earby my first wife's wedding ring, and to my son Erby [sic] her husband, my best cloak, and to my cousin, Richard Yearwood, my black cloth gown of Turkish Fashion" … rest and residue to children.... Item. Brother Thomas Yardley, ring of gold … son Ralph to be executor… said Richard Yarwood [sic] and son Edward Earbyn [sic] to be overseers'(Sec 24, Hart, Water's Gleanings, Reprinted in Genealogies of Virginia Families, Vol. 5, p. 920).

56. John Payne of Southwark, ‘who is nowe beyonde the sea’ is seen in this deed as a co-sponsor, with Thomas Griffin and William Newsum, of St. Olave's Southwark: 'William Nesum, Tho. Sax, Miles Battersby & John Payne, 800 acs. called the Island Neck, lieing on N. side of Rappa. Riv. neare Curritomon Riv. mouth, Northumberland Co., 29 Jan. 1649. Trans. of 16 pers: Richd. Mallery, Jno. Williams, Mary Cotterell, Richd. French, Joane Neale, Richd. Riley, Edward Thomas, Tho. Chevell, Richd. Smyth, Edwd. Parke, Henrry Loady, Henry Biggs, Henry Abbs, Thomas Abbs, Mary Abbs, Tho. Steed. Same: 550 acs. in same county & same date. On N. side the Rappa. Riv., adj. to the Island Neck, running N. N. W. to Marsh Poynt Cr. Trans. of 11 pers: Richd. Pagget, Richd. Jones, Ja. Richardson, Wm. Horlson, Hugh Griffin, Tho. Griffin, Tho. Grimsditch,* Edward Wright, John Gibbs, Richd. Ownes, Robert Poole' (C&P, 2, p. 188). John Payne bought land from Francis Hobbs**: 'John Payne, 653 acs. on N. side of Rappa. Riv., beg. at miles end of his land purchased of Fra. Hobbs. 2 June I657. Trans. of 13 pers'. (ibid., 4, p.362). John Payne was a neighbour of Edward Harris: 'John Paine, 88 acs. Lancaster Co., 20 Feb. 1662. N. side of Rappa. Riv., abutting N. & by W. upon land of Edward Harris, dec'd., S. by E. upon a Cr. dividing this from land of Richard Coleman. Granted to Rice Jones 2 Sept. 1652, sold to Howell Powell & George Harris, who assigned to Charles Snead & by him assigned to sd. Paine'(ibid., 5, p. 487). *On 20 Feb. 1638, Nicholas George, with John Grymsditch, received a 300 acre patent of land in Isle of Wight C., on Pagan Creek; 200 acres to Nicholas by assignment from William Clapham* to whom it was due for transportation of 4 persons. & 100 acres due sd. Grymsditch for the per. adv. of himself & wife (B. 1, p. 633). Nicholas George was the father-in-law of Thomas Harris, obit. 1672. **A dau of Francis Hobbs married John Harris, son of the said Thomas Harris.

57. Thomas Harris, obit. 1672, held land on branches of Corotoman River, a branch of Rappahannock, in 1656 ... upon land of one Hawkes, southeast upon land of William Thatcher, etc. This land was granted to Gervase Dodson on June 4, 1655, and sold by him to said Thomas Harris for 4800 lbs. of tobacco and cask. 'Gervas Dodson appointed Francis Hobbs attorney to acknowledge sale  ... Deed of Henry Thacker, recorded at Middlesex Court House. Henry Thacker (of ye parish of Christ Church) & Elizabeth, his wife, to Edwin Thacker, a tract of land given by John Payne, Senr., late of Rappahannock County, dec'd, unto Ann Payne, his daughter-in-law, late wife to his son, John Payne, Jun., dee'd, for & during the said Ann Payne's natural life. & after her decease unto the child then in her womb begotten by his said son, John Payne, Jr., which said child is Elizabeth y6 said wife of Henry Thacker, land in Rappahannock County on Pepetiak Creek'. Recorded April 17, 1690.

58. The Thomas Harris who died in 1672 bequeathed to his son, John Harris, land in the Corotoman area of Lancaster County. Thomas Harris made his will in Isle of Wight March 30, 1672, it was recorded June 10, 1672 (Book 2, p. 111). Thomas Harris m. (1) Eleanor George, daughter of Nicholas George, aforementioned, mother of John Harris, 2. Alice Newman, mother of Thomas Harris. John Harris married (1) Margaret Hobbs, daughter of Francis Hobbs. She died on Nov. 16, 1687. Alice Newman subsequently remarried John Sojourner: 'To all to Whome these present shall come to be seene or reade; knowe yee, that Whereas there is a marriage Intended to be solemmized, betweene me Alice Harris, the late relict & executrix of my deceased husband Thomas Harris of the County of Isle of Wight, and John Sojornour of the same County planter' (Deed of Gift, May 1, 1674, IOW Orphan Court). 

59.John Payne's br., Robert Payne, married Elizabeth Lawson. Their son, Robert Payne and Katharine, his wife, sold to Leonard Chamberlane and Robert Coleman a tract of land, containing 900 acres, lying on the south side of Rappahannock River, which belonged to his grandfather Epaphroditus Lawson. Witnesses to this deed were John Wood, and Samuel Griffin. Recorded October 4, 1689. Katherine Payne appeared in the Essex Co. Court, and relinquished her right of Dower, on October 10, 1689.

60. John Payne was associated with Robert walton, and Abraham Coombe, of St. Olave's, Southwark: 'Robert Walton of Rappa. By vertue of Letter of Attorney from Nicholas Andrews of London Gent bearing date 15 Oct 1663 … in consideration of 400 lbs. of tobacco ... to John Payne of County of Rappa. 560 A of land by the within mentioned formerly sold and conveied to the said Nicholas Andrews by the said John Payne … he the said John Payne paying and performing the Rents and services thereof due … this 8th day of October 1666. s/ Robert Walton. In presence of John Payne, Jr., Charles Mumford, Richard Payne, Abraham Comb, Thomas Parker' (D&W 5, p. 109). In 1658: Mr. John Payne and Mr. John Catlett witnessed the noncupative will of Richard Lawson, brother of Epaphroditus Lawson, whose daughter, Elizabeth, as stated, married Robert Payne, John's brother. William Clapham, having married the relict of Epa. Lawson is granted administration of his estate (B. 1, p. 16). Epa. Lawson was the br. of Richard Lawson. 
 
61. Thomas Harris held land on branches of Corotoman River, a branch of Rappahannock, in 1656 ... upon land of one Hawkes, southeast upon land of William Thatcher, etc.* This land was granted to Gervase Dodson on June 4, 1655, and sold by him to said Thomas Harris for 4800 lbs. of tobacco and cask. Gervas Dodson appointed Francis Hobbs attorney to acknowledge sale  ... Deed of Henry Thacker, recorded at Middlesex Court House. Henry Thacker (of ye parish of Christ Church) & Elizabeth, his wife, to Edwin Thacker, a tract of land given by John Payne, Senr., late of Rappahannock County, dec'd, unto Ann Payne, his daughter-in-law, late wife to his son, John Payne, Jun., dee'd, for & during the said Ann Payne's natural life. & after her decease unto the child then in her womb begotten by his said son, John Payne, Jr., which said child is Elizabeth ye said wife of Henry Thacker, land in Rappahannock County on Pepetiak Creek'. Date 17 April, 1690. The first thatcher marriage recorded in St. Olave's was between 'Edwarde Thatcher and Ann Pulford', on February 4, 1610.

62.The Thomas Harris who died in 1672 bequeathed to his son, John Harris, land in the Corotoman area of Lancaster County. Thomas Harris made his will in Isle of Wight March 30, 1672, it was recorded June 10, 1672 (B. 2, p. 111). Thomas Harris married (1) Eleanor George, daughter of Nicholas George, and mother of John Harris, 2. Alice Newman, mother of Thomas Harris. John Harris married (1) Margaret Hobbs, daughter of Francis Hobbs. She died on Nov. 16, 1687. Alice Newman subsequently remarried John Sojourner: 'To all to Whome these present shall come to be seene or reade; knowe yee, that Whereas there is a marriage Intended to be solemmized, betweene me Alice Harris, the late relict & executrix of my deceased husband Thomas Harris of the County of Isle of Wight, and John Sojornour of the same County planter' (Deed of Gift, May 1, 1674, IOW Orphan Court.

63. It may be recalled that Joan Griffin, of St. Olave's, sailed to Virginia on a ship captained by Robert Fox, no doubt related to Captain David Fox, merchant, who received a grant of 372 acres on Moratico Creek, in Lancaster County, May 23, 1650. He married Anne Mottrom, widow of Richard Wright, merchant, and daughter of Colonel John Mottrom, merchant. In 1662, he made a deed to Robert Tomlin in trust for himself, during life, and then to his daughter, Hannah Fox, and in case of her failing to have heirs of her body, then to his son, David Fox. In 1664, He made a similar deed in Lancaster, giving to Hanna, his daughter, all wearing apparel belonging to his wife, Mary. The Will of David Fox, of Lancaster, proved January 6, 1669, bequests: 'To son William and daughter Elizabeth the plantation I lately purchased of Mr. Thomas Colclough, of London, Merchant, in Northumberland County, Virginia, formerly belonging to Mr. George Colclough dec'd, brother of said Thomas, containing 2,266 acres; in case said Colclough shall not make a legal conveyance, I bequeath to said children £400 (which money with more, is now in hands of Jno. Jeffreys, of London, Merchant & said Colclough ... to daughter, Rebecca, the wife of Robt. Tomlin (who 'imported a John Harris in 1663) ... to parish of St. Mary White Chapel £20 sterling for glasing and other use of the church. Son Davyd sole executor & Mr. William Ball, Senior, & Mr. Edward Dale overseers'. 

64. There is a connection to the Griffin family of St. Olave's: 'A list of several bills belonging to John Jefferys Esq. and Mr. Thomas Colclough Mercht. dd to Giles Cale by Samuel Griffin includes: Abraham Combes (of St. olave's), Mrs Eliz Loes, Rich. Powell, Hum. Booth, Colo. Fantleroy.'Received of the hands of Mr. Samuel Griffin the severeral [sic] bills above mentioned x x' (June 1, 1663. Lancaster, B.2, p. 263). The grandson of David Fox, Samuel Fox, married Anne, probably daughter of John Payne and Ann Walker (See 'Quarterly', VIII., 96).
 

65. Robert Tomlin's Will bequests 'to son Robert Tomlin all my land and plantation at Arraricke with all the household goods & stock upon it to him & his heirs forever ... Item I give unto my Cozen George Tomlin one young Mare about two years old ... I will & bequeath unto my daughter Rebecca Tomlin all the plantation & Land whereon I now live after her mothers decease unto her & her heirs forever. Item. I will & bequeath unto my daughter Hannah Tomlin the Land I formerly bought of Thomas Rawson ... Item my will is & I freely bequeath unto my brother Capt. George Taylor one of my saddle horses which are upon my plantation which he shall please to accept of after my decease ... Item I give unto my Cozen Martha Taylor my mare about two years old with her increase to her & her heirs forever ... Item I give unto my sister Mrs Martha Taylor one Gold ring about 12 shillings price. Recorded October 3, 1688. The Griffins and Tomlins were cousins through both intermarrying with the Taylors.

66. Robt. Tomlyn & Wm. Mosse, 600 acs. Rappa. Co., on N. side Rappa. Riv. May 25, 1663. 'Beg. on Swd. side of a slash behind land of Mathias Tomlyn, decd., running over several branches that runs into Mr. Taylors Beavor Damms &c. to br. belonging to Chestuxen run &c. Trans. of 12 pers: Wm. Langdaule, Edw. Blackburne, Jno. Mainyard, Wm. Gunn, Jno. Harris, Elizabeth Fosseting, Geo. Morrell, Tho. French, John Catten, Jno. Murr, Diana Mainshaw' (C&P, B. 5, p. 491). Who was Jno. Harris?


67. 'George Bryar & Rich. Lawrence, 3000 acs. Rappa. Co. on Ewd. side of Rappa. Cr., 16 Mar. 1663. Beg. on sd. Cr. side adj. land of Col. More Fantleroy (Samuel Griffin's son-in-law; Samuel Griffin, to repeat, being of that family of St. olave's, Sothwark) & opposite to the now plantation of Col. Walker, extending along the Cr. side to land of Charles Grimes, dec'd., bounded by same, land of Mr. Jno. Hull & his own to white oak in his Cr. &c. Trans. of 60 pers: Jno. Cole, Wm. Williams, Mary Jones, Wm. Wright, 7 Negroes, Ann Jones, Andrew Jones, Stephen Waters, Richard White, Nathall. Pine, Henry Addison, Jno. Martin, Mary Cole, Mary Wise, Peter Ware, Jno. Pigg, Jno. Garratt, Mary Stone, Ann Stone, Thomas Harris, Ann Harris, Susan Harris, Margtt. Williamson, Richard Mines, Mary Orchard, thrice, Wm. Stephens, Mathews Peters, Stephen Margetts, Timothy Collins, Robt. Collingworth, Peter Gage, & his wife, Wm. Norton, Warwick Pea, James Stone, Francis Skinner, Andrew Foreman, Norton Jones, Henry Etmore (or Elmore), Peter Rix, Susan Lawnes, Mathew Tomlin, Richd. Everdew, Susan Pike, 5 Negroes; Thomas Atkins, Andrew Joyner, Thomas Wms. (Williams), Margtt. Jones' (ibid., p. 527). Who were Thomas, Ann, and Susan Harris? Is Thomas Harris he who died in 1688?, associated with Mathew Tomlin.


68. Richard Lawrence was a partner of Thomas Williamson, probably of the family heretofore mentioned, and as such, a kinsman of the Griffin and Harris families of St. Olave's: 'To all &c. Whereas &c. Now Know yee that I the said Sir Wm. Berkeley Knt. Governor &c. give and grant unto Rich. Lawrence, Evan Davis, and Thomas Williamson nine hundred acres of land scituated in the County of Rappa. bounded as foll. vizt beginning at a marked white oake standing on the Eastward side of a white marish at the head of a branch issuing out of the Dragon swamp, and Crossing Mattapony upper path thence running Southerly alongst the said branch to the Dragon swamp thence Easterly alongst the said swamp to another branch thereof, thence alongst the said branch to a marked tree standing in Mattapony path thence alongst the Path 24 degres north westerly 85 pole, No. No. West 278? pole, thence West No. west 51 pole, thence west by No. 204 pole, to the first specified place including the quantity aforesaid The said Land being due unto the said Lawrence, Davis, and Williamson by and for the transportacon of 18 persons To have and to hold &c. To bee held &c. Yeilding and paying &c. Provided &c. Dated ye 16th June 1663. Ann Stevens, Mary Tye, Nathaniell Atkins, Susanna Stone, Richard Lawnes, Peter Stoner, Margtt. Andrews, Wm. Peterson, Davy Anderson, Wm. Norton, Peter Pope, Peter Andrewes, Henry Hart, Rich. Wiseman, Stephen Pine, Hannah Dew, Margtt. Tollon, Mathew Stevens' (B. 5, p. 408). Richard Lawrence was one of three commissioners to settle the boundary line between Virginia and Maryland, with Edmund Scarborough and John Catlett. 


69. Anthony Arnold 1669, 31 Aug: Witnessed, with Timothy Davis, a power of attorney by Arthur Hodges to Edward Hudson, and a power of attorney by Katherine Hubbert to John Forth to acknowledge her right and title to 375 acres sold by her former husband, Thomas Williamson, to James Fossett, Rappahannock Co., VA. (1) Richard Hubbard had been granted 1600 acres of land in Westmoreland Co., VA for transport of 32 persons on 12 Dec 1654, among them William Arnoll.

To be concluded.

copyright m stanhope 2015

 

                                                               AEMELIA BASSANO
 

                                       Emilia (or Aemelia) Bassano Lanier (1569–1645) (also spelled Lanyer) was the first Englishwoman to assert herself as a professional poet through her single volume of poems, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (1611). As part of the Lanier family tree, she was a member of the minor gentry through her father's appointment as a royal musician, and was apparently educated in the household by Susan Bertie, Countess of Kent.: History, Clothing Tudor Elizabethan, 16Th Century, Century Artworks, Circa 1590, God, Lanier Families, Families Trees, Elizabethan Portraits